Work for 20th December 2017

Create a Word document, give it the filename 17_12_20_name (year month day so that when sorted into numerical order the files are in date order: neat huh?) where name is your own name. At the end of the lesson save a copy of your Word document into Student common \ ICT \ Collaboration\ _Mr_Mitchell \ Year 11 Computer Science \ Classwork. All of your work is to be completed on this Word document: add appropriate screenshots, diagrams, drawings and images where necessary.


First,

Work for 13th December 2017

Create a Word document, give it the filename 17_12_13_name (year month day so that when sorted into numerical order the files are in date order: neat huh?) where name is your own name. At the end of the lesson save a copy of your Word document into Student common \ ICT \ Collaboration\ _Mr_Mitchell \ Year 11 Computer Science \ Classwork. All of your work is to be completed on this Word document: add appropriate screenshots, diagrams, drawings and images where necessary.


First,

Work for 6th December 2017

Create a Word document, give it the filename 17_12_06_name (year month day so that when sorted into numerical order the files are in date order: neat huh?) where name is your own name. At the end of the lesson save a copy of your Word document into Student common \ ICT \ Collaboration\ _Mr_Mitchell \ Year 11 Computer Science \ Classwork. All of your work is to be completed on this Word document: add appropriate screenshots, diagrams, drawings and images where necessary.


First,

Work for 29th November 2017

Create a Word document, give it the filename 17_11_29_name (year month day so that when sorted into numerical order the files are in date order: neat huh?) where name is your own name. At the end of the lesson save a copy of your Word document into Student common \ ICT \ Collaboration\ _Mr_Mitchell \ Year 11 Computer Science \ Classwork. All of your work is to be completed on this Word document: add appropriate screenshots, diagrams, drawings and images where necessary.


First,

Work for 22nd November 2017

Create a Word document, give it the filename 17_11_22_name (year month day so that when sorted into numerical order the files are in date order: neat huh?) where name is your own name. At the end of the lesson save a copy of your Word document into Student common \ ICT \ Collaboration\ _Mr_Mitchell \ Year 11 Computer Science \ Classwork. All of your work is to be completed on this Word document: add appropriate screenshots, diagrams, drawings and images where necessary.


First,

Work for 15th November 2017

Create a Word document, give it the filename 17_11_15_name (year month day so that when sorted into numerical order the files are in date order: neat huh?) where name is your own name. At the end of the lesson save a copy of your Word document into Student common \ ICT \ Collaboration\ _Mr_Mitchell \ Year 11 Computer Science \ Classwork. All of your work is to be completed on this Word document: add appropriate screenshots, diagrams, drawings and images where necessary.


Mock examination solution. Click here for the solution to the mock examination.


Look at the asnwers that you gave to the questions that were set and compare these to the answers you were given. There are extra questions included in the explanation provided for each answer. Answer all of these extra questions.

Work for 8th November 2017

Mock examinations.


Revise for your examinations.

Work for 1st November 2017

Create a Word document, give it the filename 17_11_01_name (year month day so that when sorted into numerical order the files are in date order: neat huh?) where name is your own name. At the end of the lesson save a copy of your Word document into Student common \ ICT \ Collaboration\ _Mr_Mitchell \ Year 11 Computer Science \ Classwork. All of your work is to be completed on this Word document: add appropriate screenshots, diagrams, drawings and images where necessary.


First, here are examples of two programs; each program inputs a number and then subtracts 32 if the number is in the range 97 to 122.

Python (a high level language)

IBM assembly language

Give two reasons why computer programs are most commonly written in high-level languages instead of low-level languages.

Give two reasons why it is better to write programs in assembly language than in machine code.

Here is another program written in "Penjee" a sort of text based scratch.

This is the space where penguin can move about. The bottom left hand corner is (0,0) so this penguin is in (1,0).

In the program identify any "method".

In the program identify any "comment".

In the program identify any "object".

State the selection method used in the program.

State the loop method used in the program.


Second, here is a Python program that calculates and displays the discount on a price.

Here is the output.

As you can see the program is successful and yet contains an error. Identify the error in the code.


Second, a developer has decomposed a problem to claculate the income from selling orchard frruit at a local market into three sub-problems.

The developer is taking the structured approach to developing the solution to this problem. He wants to implement each sub-problem as a subroutine. Each subroutine will have its own interface.

(a) State three properties of a subroutine interface.

(b) State two benefits of developing solutions using the structured approach.

(c) A developer is using the structured approach to developing a solution and wants to write a subroutine to solve one of the sub-problems. This subroutine should have the following interface:
 The subroutine is called find_minimum
 The subroutine takes an array (of integers) as a parameter
 The subroutine returns the smallest value in the parameter array.
Using pseudo-code or a flowchart, write a subroutine that solves this sub-problem. The subroutine must have the correct interface.


Third, a developer is developing a program for a client. The developer is given the following instructions.

“Many of my friends ask me to walk their dogs for them. All of these friends pay me to do this and the amount I get paid depends on how long I walk their dogs for. If they have more than one dog then I don’t charge the owner any extra. I like to walk the dogs in the afternoon when the weather is normally best because I often get colds. I need you to help me keep track of how much money I’m owed – fortunately for me all of my friends have different first names so it’s really easy to tell them apart. I charge £10 for every 30 minutes of the walk (and I always round this up so 47 minutes would be two half-hour charges or £20).”

The developer needs to remove all of the unnecessary detail from the client’s request. Is this "Abstraction" or "Conversion" or "Decomposition" or "Validation"?

Work for half term 23rd to 27th October 2017

Have a good look at the solutions to coursework tasks given by the Exam Board listed below. Familiarize yourself with how the candidates have approached, documented and coded their solutions. I am not allowed to include any of the NEA materials for 2018 electronically and therefore will not do so. Are there any ideas or coding steps that are common to all four of the solutions provided? Can you see how the solution has been designed and how that design has been communicated to the examiner? Is the level of presentation and the quality of the report good in each case? Is the testing effective and well communicated? Has the candidate explained to the examiner about the testing boundaries and erroneous values? Don't forget that you can always make use of the Python Guide.

Work for 18th October 2017

Create a Word document, give it the filename 17_10_18_name (year month day so that when sorted into numerical order the files are in date order: neat huh?) where name is your own name. At the end of the lesson save a copy of your Word document into Student common \ ICT \ Collaboration\ _Mr_Mitchell \ Year 11 Computer Science \ Classwork. All of your work is to be completed on this Word document: add appropriate screenshots, diagrams, drawings and images where necessary.


Important. I have been asked if it is possible to have access to the Python work and notes that were created last year as part of the year 10 teaching. It is not possible to have access to your normal account during the NEA under any circumstances. However, it would be acceptable to print out any information that you think might be relevant before the NEA starts so that it can be kept in the secure folder that will be given to each candidate at the start of each NEA session and returned to invigilator at the end of each session. You must make sure that your name is on every page that you print out. At the end of the Wednesday lesson you must hand the folder to Mr Hughes who will ensure that it is kept securely until it is required in the NEA.

This is a once only deal and must be done before you start the NEA.


First, explain what is meant by a data type.


Second, a database stores information about sports fixtures and their results. For each data item state the most appropriate data type. (The first answer is done for you.)

Data item Data type   Data item Data type   Data item Data type
Name of the team String   Goal scorer(s)     Extra time?  
Match won?     League position     Match duration (in mins)  
Data of the fixture     Goals against     Cup round  
Goals for     Manager     Start time  

Third, explain what is meant by a bit. According to the examination board...

5 Kbytes is how many bytes?     A byte is how many bits  
8 Mbytes is how many Kbytes?     The K in Kbytes stands for  
2 Tbytes is how many Gbytes?     The G in Gbytes stands for  
12 Gbytes is how many Mbytes?     The T in Tbytes stands for  

Fourth, convert the following set of numbers into their ASCII equivalents using the table below (for example "1" is 49, 3 * 16 +1).

78, 111, 119, 32, 105, 115, 32, 116, 104, 101, 32, 119, 105, 110, 116, 101, 114

Code the following into a set of numbers using the ASCII code.

of our discontent

0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
0          


 
1                
2   ! " # $ % & ' ( ) * + , - . /
3 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 : ; < = > ?
4 @ A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O
5 P Q R S T U V W X Y Z [ \ ] ^ _
6 ` a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o
7 p q r s t u v w x y z { | } ~ 

 


Fifth, copy and complete the following truth tables.

A B C   (A and B)   (A or C)   (A and B) or (A or C)
0 0 0            
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
1 1 1            

 

A B C   (A or B)   (B or C)   (A or B) and (B or C)
0 0 0            
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
1 1 1            

 

A B C   (A or B)   not C   (A or B) and not C
0 0 0            
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
1 1 1            

 

A B C   not A   (B or C)   not A and (B or C)
0 0 0            
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
1 1 1            

 


IF all of this is complete then make sure that all of the answers to the work from the previous weeks and the two examination papers that were set at the end of last year are complete. (First and second papers.)

Work for 11th October 2017

Create a Word document, give it the filename 17_10_11_name (year month day so that when sorted into numerical order the files are in date order: neat huh?) where name is your own name. At the end of the lesson save a copy of your Word document into Student common \ ICT \ Collaboration\ _Mr_Mitchell \ Year 11 Computer Science \ Classwork. All of your work is to be completed on this Word document: add appropriate screenshots, diagrams, drawings and images where necessary.


First, describe, compare and contrast linear and binary search algorithms.


Second, identify which of the following conversions are right or wrong. Show your working out.

Dec Hex   Dec Bin   Hex Bin
135 87   226 11100010   CD 11001100
245 F5   223 11011111   84 10000100
210 D3   71 01000101   56 01010110
41 29   149 10010101   71 01110101

Third, add the following 8 bit binary numbers making sure to show your working out.

64 32 16 8 4 2 1 Decimal value  
0 1 1 1 1 0 1    
0 1 0 1 0 1 0  
               

 

64 32 16 8 4 2 1 Decimal value  
1 1 0 1 1 0 1    
0 0 0 1 0 1 0  
               

 


Fourth, here is a four by four grid pattern,

Show that if black is 1 and white is 0 this is B442 in hex. (Hint, convert to binary and then to hex.)

Similarly show that this four by four grid pattern

is B54A.


Fifth, explain (in exactly 300 words) what is meant by the term "rootkit" when referring to to malicious code. Use these notes to help you as searching for this topic may be difficult in school.


IF all of this is complete then make sure that all of the answers to the work from the previous weeks and the two examination papers that were set at the end of last year are complete. (First and second papers.)

Work for 4th October 2017

Create a Word document, give it the filename 17_10_04_name (year month day so that when sorted into numerical order the files are in date order: neat huh?) where name is your own name. At the end of the lesson save a copy of your Word document into Student common \ ICT \ Collaboration\ _Mr_Mitchell \ Year 11 Computer Science \ Classwork. All of your work is to be completed on this Word document: add appropriate screenshots, diagrams, drawings and images where necessary.


First, explain the following three computing terms: algorithm, abstraction and decomposition.


Second, draw a flowchart using any software available to you that shows how a computer can input then add three numbers and then find an average. Extend your answer to include any number of numbers. Hint, use part of the solution to the work on 28th September to help.


Third, define the terms hardware and software and explain the relationship between them.


Fourth, explain with suitable diagrams the three computing terms LAN, WAN and PAN.


Fifth, in your own words (no more than 300 of them) describe the history, evolution and purpose of the technology, "Ethernet".


IF all of this is complete then make sure that all of the answers to the work from the previous weeks and the two examination papers that were set at the end of last year are complete. (First and second papers.)

Work for 28th September 2017

Create a Word document, give it the filename 17_08_28_name (year month day so that when sorted into numerical order the files are in date order: neat huh?) where name is your own name. At the end of the lesson save a copy of your Word document into Student common \ ICT \ Collaboration\ _Mr_Mitchell \ Year 11 Computer Science \ Classwork. All of your work is to be completed on this Word document: add appropriate screenshots, diagrams, drawings and images where necessary. Solution


First, this is a programming task. Use the Python Guide to help you to solve this problem. Create a menu (use the guide to help) that offers four choices.

1. Convert an entered value from Fahrenheit to Celsius. You will find a formula here as well as in the Python Guide.

2. Find the average of three real numbers.

3. Input 5 names and store them in an array and then sort the array of names into alphabetical order. This link or this or this might help.

4. Input a whole number and then print out the times table (1 to 12) for that number.

When the program runs the user can select one of the four choices and then the selected choice will be executed.

Make an outline plan as we have done before and complete as much as possible in the two lessons. Document everything that you have done including screenshots of code, output and testing.

IF all of this is complete then make sure that all of the answers to the work from the previous weeks and the two examination papers that were set at the end of last year are complete. (First and second papers.)

Work for 27th September 2017

Create a Word document, give it the filename 17_09_27_name (year month day so that when sorted into numerical order the files are in date order: neat huh?) where name is your own name. At the end of the lesson save a copy of your Word document into Student common \ ICT \ Collaboration\ _Mr_Mitchell \ Year 11 Computer Science \ Classwork. All of your work is to be completed on this Word document: add appropriate screenshots, diagrams, drawings and images where necessary.


First, using this link, write a 100 word summary of "compression" using terms from Matt's blog. (Exactly 100 words please). Now look at this bitesize page and improve your summary by adding exactly 50 words (in a different colour) as some of Matt's terminology is a little loose.


Second, calculating file sizes. This is in two parts. First part: a medium quality audio file has a sample rate of 22,100 samples per second; the bit depth is set at 8 bits per sample and the audio file is recording stereo. If the audio file lasts 100 seconds, calculate the size of the file. Show your working; you might find this page useful. Second part: if the file is to be streamed and the musical group want the file size to be less than 10 megabytes then to what should the sampling rate be changed?


Third, using the diagram below, complete the code assignment table using Huffman code.

Letter Assignment
A 0
B  
C  
D  
R 11

 


Fourth, Create a Huffman tree for the following text sample. Your tree should indicate the binary code paths required to be followed in order to obtain each unique character.

here horse

The table below shows the completed code assignment table. Show that this table matches your tree.

Letter Assignment
h 11
r 10
e 00
o 0101
s 0100
space 011

 


Fifth, in your Word document draw and label the three types of network topologies that the examiner expects you to know.


Sixth, convert the following binary number to decimal, 11010100, 00110100, 01100111, 10101111, 01110111


IF all of this is complete then make sure that all of the answers to the work from the previous week and the two examination papers that were set at the end of last year are complete. (First and second papers.)

Work for 20th/13th September 2017

Create a Word document, give it the filename 17_09_20_name (year month day so that when sorted into numerical order the files are in date order: neat huh?) where name is your own name. At the end of the lesson save a copy of your Word document into Student common \ ICT \ Collaboration\ _Mr_Mitchell \ Year 11 Computer Science \ Classwork. All of your work is to be completed on this Word document: add appropriate screenshots, diagrams, drawings and images where necessary.


First check that Virtual Box and Python works as it should. Write a simple program to input and add two numbers (use the Python Guide (pdf) to help), save it to your own work area. Close Virtual Box, re-open it and load the program that you have just written: make sure that it still works. Screenshot the program and the output. On the screenshot identify all of the variables that you have used. Extension: use casting to include real numbers as well as integers. If Virtual Box does not work then screenshot the error message and add that to your document instead.


Next, research and write (in your own words) a summary of the ethical issue of "driverless cars". You must include a bibliography. You may wish to consider some or all of the following. Are they a good thing? Will they help reduce congestion for example? Who is at fault if there is an accident? Consider these ideas. I am expecting about a page of typing (no larger than 12 point) not including images. You may wish to consider other issues such as the ethical "trolley problem" shown below. If the video does not play then click on the video to go to the relevant YouTube site. If headphones are not available in B5 then read the transcript. If you still cannot access the content then move on to a different source.

 

The Sydney Morning Herald asks "Who to kill? The ethical dilemma for driverless car manufacturers." People are generally in favour of sacrificing an individual passenger for the safety of other innocent road users but are less enthusiastic when there are more passengers in the car. Is this reasonable and might you feel the same way?

This TED talk poses the question, "are the programmers responsible for the actions of the devices that they program?" If the video does not play then click on the video to go to the relevant YouTube site. If headphones are not available in B5 then read the transcript. If you still cannot access the content then move on to a different source.

 

The Economist article discusses the 5 levels of autonomous vehicle but still asks "are autonomous vehicles safe to be allowed on the road?"

Finally a CNN page gives the result of a survey showing that people want a car that protects them and yet would be "moral" in its choices to sacrifice a passenger for a number of pedestrians.

Find as much information as you can and write a summary on the ethical issues surrounding the use of driverless cars.


Third, explain in your own words with examples where appropriate the term"Boolean algebra". You should include circuit diagrams and logic tables in your answer.


Fourthly, explain the difference between a "half adder" and a "full adder" - you may use images from Logicly to help to explain your answer. Explain why the inputs A, B, C(in) and the outputs S and C(out) are used.


Finally, convert the following hex numbers to decimal. FACE, CAB9, 8DAD and BEEB.

IF all of this is complete then make sure that all of the answers to the two examination papers that were set at the end of last year are complete. (First and second papers.)

Holiday Homework set on 12th July 2017

This homework is to be completed over half term and is due on 12th September 2017 (I think)

There are 15 extra questions written in the second explanation of the the summer examination to be completed in your exercise book. All of the additional questions are written in blue.

Homework set on 10th July 2017

This homework is to be completed over half term and is due on 12th July 2017.

There are a dozen extra questions written in the explanation of the the summer examination to be completed in your exercise book. All of the additional dozen questions are written in blue.

Homework

This homework is to be completed over half term and is due on 31st October 2016.

Write the algorithm (in words) for each of the following segments of code. Click on an image to see a full size version.

1. The Snap Game

2. A quiz question

3. A Guessing Game

4. Binary to decimal conversion. Write an algorithm to convert an 8-bit binary number into decimal

Teaching scheme (Draft version making use of notes so far.)

Number bases - Binary, Decimal, Hex - mention Octal.

Converting number bases - Binary to Decimal and Hex, Decimal to Binary and Hex and Hex to Binary and Decimal. Complete the document and self assess using guidance from the teacher. Explain the process involved in each conversion in your book.

"Fun task" Make use of Excel to create a decimal to binary conversion using formulae and then check back to decimal.

The non-black digits have been calculated using a formula. The binary equivalent is the concatenation of cells D3 to J3. There is a bin2dec function in Excel that can be used to check the answer.

Units of information - briefly discus the bit, byte, nybble and kilo, mega giga and tera options.

Binary arithmetic - demonstrate and discus the adding of two binary digits including the "carry". Graduated exercises to be completed in your book. Important point to note. If the same number is added to itself the digits slide one place to the left (do the students notice this). This is the effect of multiplying the value by 2. Extension activity: Demonstrate and explain "shift and add" to make use of this principle and finding a use for binary addition.

Character encoding. ASCII and Unicode and the issues of 7-bit character encoding

Representing images as binary values to be stored in a computer. Convert an image to a binary value and a binary value to an image. Calculate the size of a file. Investigate the terms Pixel and bit depth. Introduce data compression.

Representing sound as a series of binary values depending on the bit depth and the sampling rate. Consider issues of quality and file size and data transmission. Consider data compression further.

Data compression is used so that data can be stored or transmitted effectively. Consider lossy and lossless methods.

Unit examination

Representing algorithms

Constructing algorithms and trace tables

Decomposition

Abstraction

Constructing code and algorithms.

Efficient algorithms

Algorithms for searching

Algorithms for sorting



 

Set work

Useful links (AQA Guides)

Questions

These are questions that relate to the AQA guides above.

Revision

These are some revision topics and example questions that will aid revision for the year 10 examination on 23rd June 2017. Just because it is in this list does not mean that its in the exam and if it is not in the list it does not mean that the topic is not inthe exam.

Mock examination

Here are the answers to the mock examination that you took in the summer.

For many students the objective here is to understand how to answer questions, to see where silly mistakes were made that cost easy marks and to appreciate how the examiner can aske questions relating to the theory that you already know.

Coursework

Here is the information regarding your coursework as well as some worked examples to show you how coursework should be written up.

The coursework will be done twice, once with the example task for practice and then the real NEA task. You will only have 20 hours in which to complete the real task; there cannot be any extra time given.